Jump to content
YNWA

Mysties - breeding tips please

Recommended Posts

YNWA    6

Hi all,

I have a group of 5 (I think a 1.4......only heard 1 calling), which I've had for 14 months, they are believed to be almost 18 months old. The male calls constantly and has done for months but no sign of courtship or eggs.

The viv is a 24x18x24, is fairly heavily planted and has film canisters.

Any advice/tips to give them a helping hand would be very much appreciated.

Tony

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
YNWA    6

Hi Nick,

Thanks for taking the time to reply. They are on an automated system which sprays 3 times a day.

Cheers!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nick    445

Sounds like they are too wet, when I was breeding them used to hand spray them twice a day max, remember these frogs are found on the cliffs in Peru and not in the high humidity of a rainforest, good ventilation is also key.

hope this helps

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
stevef    38

Mine breed well at 21 - 22 degrees, kept on the dryer side and prefer low light.

Low light seam's to be one of the keys.

I have 1.4 around 18 months to 2 years old, producing around 12 - 20 tads a month.

One thing I notice is that tads grow very very slowly.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
YNWA    6

Hi Steve,

Thanks for taking the time to reply and for all of the detail, that's awesome. Blimey, 12-20 a month that's fantastic. Where do they tend to lay their eggs for you?

I think I will detach their viv from the automatic misting system and revert to hand misting for the moment as keeping them on the drier side is definitely becoming a theme.

When you say low light, I just have the standard Arcadia T5 over them. May I ask what you have and also a photo of the viv of that's not too much trouble. Would be good to see a successful viv layout (I recently moved my 3 Azureus from one viv to another to free up a larger viv for my newest recruits and I hardly ever use to see them before, now they are almost always out and about, the change was instant. I was so surprised but it highlighted very apparently how unsuitable/suitable frogs can find a viv.

Apologise for all the questions.

Tony

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
stevef    38

You said that you have had them for 14 months, have they been in the same viv all this time.

If so there's an old trick you can try, it means money and time but you can try putting them in a completely different viv.

I don't why this makes a difference but it works, I tried this on tricolours, auratus, and azureus all not breeding until change, within 6 weeks tads every where.

Light wise it can be as bright as you like up high but they like an OPEN understory that's dark, mine is so dark that I have to use a strong led torch to see anything in there.

Egg wish they lay in high (in full light) film canisters but I keep my bom axail dry and have 2" wide 1"deep pots with water (about 8) on the floor this way I can control the tads especially if you are limiting spray were the brom axial pools can dry up accidentally kill the tads.

There is also a lot written about the effects of vitamins to encouraging frogs to breed.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
YNWA    6

Hi Steve,

Yes, always been in the same viv. I've done made some relatively light alterations in that time, added a couple of new plants, replenished leaf litter but nothing that would constitute a re-vamp. Do you see an issue with me keeping them temporarily (say 2-3 days) in a large rub (grow out type) whilst I overhaul the existing viv and then return them?

That's bizarre how that works, I wonder why? Perhaps it nullifies the dominance in the group and puts them all on a level playing field.

So to achieve the dim/dark ground level, presumably the only way to obtain this is to heavily plant the viv to create a canopy that blocks out the light. Here's a pic of the viv currently, I'm guessing it's far to bright based on your comments.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
stevef    38

Looks good to me, were the large brim with the red centre is, I would try to open up the bottom with a dark hollow using plants as a sort of a roof as you said in your post.

The top light is fine and I can't see there being a problem keep them in a tub for a few days.

I don't know why it works, steve (skoobanut) my mentor ( or is that mental) put me on this.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
YNWA    6

Hi Steve,

Thanks for your thoughts.

It's not overly clear from the picture but there is narrow-ish cork round leading from the front to the rear where it sits on top of a larger cork round which goes left to right at the rear of the viv. This creates a dark hollow type area as you described, with plenty of leaf litter and Savu pods. Perhaps I could make that area larger and with a bit more height to beneath the shelter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
YNWA    6

Hi Nick,

I initially bought two lots of unsexed trio's from different people within a month of each, sadly I lost one of the 6 about a month later (no idea what caused it) but they've lived together in the same viv ever since.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nick    445
1 hour ago, YNWA said:

Hi Nick,

I initially bought two lots of unsexed trio's from different people within a month of each, sadly I lost one of the 6 about a month later (no idea what caused it) but they've lived together in the same viv ever since.

that's probably your issue then, I generally find that frogs that where raised together sometimes don't breed well not sure if this is a way to reduce inbreeding but separate the male for a month or so then add him back in. A example from my personal experience is a had a pair of Azureus both raised together and had no signs of breeding or eggs for over 18 months, there was another breeder in the same situation as me so we deiced to swap males. The very next day we both had eggs from both pairs.

Nick

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kroot    243

I've had tricolours that only bred after one or two escape. This used to happen maybe twice a year. After each capture they chucked out eggs. The Couchero pums also went crazy after moving viv. I think it seems to be a valid way of trying.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
stevef    38

I to had a group of tricolor that live together and done nothing for 8 months when I moved them into a large lounge display viv just before Xmas they started breeding straight away, now 4 months later I had over a hundred tadpoles and froglets.

Now some times I wish they would stop lol.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
YNWA    6

Hi Nick, Kroot, Steve,

Thank you all for your input, forums are invaluable for acquiring others experience and thoughts, our hobby can feel a very lonely place when things aren't going quite to plan due to it not being particularly mainstream so people's willingness to pitch in and comment is  huge help.

I think I'm going to give the reduced misting which I started on Saturday a little longer to see if that's successful, if not then a viv overhaul and then lastly remove the male (poor guys calling away like mad as I'm typing this........must be soooooo frustrated!!) for a month or so and then re-introduce. Hopefully one of the above will have the desired effect and I'll reporting eggs and tads along with a massive thank you!!

Steve, depending on where you live, I know of two people looking for Tricolours (I'm assuming you are intending to sell at least some of your MANY tads, they are prolific little buggers are they!!) so let me know if you are ready to move any on.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kroot    243

If mine kick off soon I maybe forced to flood the Epsom area with the little darlings. YNWA we should meet up some time, along with Alex and Jaise, as we are in frog terms on each others doorstep!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
YNWA    6

That sounds like a great idea, I'd be up for that for sure. Didn't realise there were many/any people nearby.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kroot    243

Well after a cat attack and having to rescue the survivors half way down the stairs, they are breeding again. So escaping seems to be a good tactic for tricolours at least.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Stu    426

some cool pointers here tony,but for me the end of the world senario,ie sommit bad happens froggy feels world is gonna end,therfore does the most important thing possible keep s it's gene pool alive,ie breeds is not the ideal.

 

Frankly I also feel the rearing together is a great shout(to p[lausibly prevent breeding as they think they are siblings),but the trio I originally bought to go with AERO our first mystie were just that,reared together and that didn't have any effect.

My guess beyond absolute health of breeding stock diet uvb carrotenoids etc is the water picked up early on by Nick. I feel they are being kept too wet have had no dry season,(this one is had core,do the research I sadly haven't time to go there with you now,i'd love to bro,but it's out there written many times so little point in repeating) needs to be part of all our frogs lives.

 

so give them some dry ,proper dry hard core dry,BUT ALWAYS!!!!! a means to rehydrate for a couple of months or more,then when it's absolutley P*ssing down outside,a real hard core low drown the viv and keep that humidity up. 

 

Tony nowt is 100% no for sure here. I'd just rather you try to replicate natural stimulii to breed rather than the worlds gonna end senario. Oh and i'm not saying Adrian is wrong about this,it happens when we move frogs too,or in anyway doing any form of diservice to his beloved frogs,I know how much the guy cares already.    hey Adrian how are ya bro. It's just I still feel frog keepers don't talk on the dry enough or really assimilate it's importance, how drastic it can be...especially newer folks to froggie keeping.

 

Nature is hard we probably want to be almost too kind,I mean not one of us would really advocate hardship for our frogs,we love 'em want the best we can do for 'em. Put it this way who in blighty or anywhere actually keeps their leucs so hard so dry that they eastivate? I don't that's for sure,but in the wild that is their lot.

 

Phibs are a relatively simple life form,they respond to stimulii. give them dry them wet and time this to link into the natural stimulii they are reading ie barometric pressure drops,even right time of year,they'll breed

 

All the luck bro

 

stu  

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×